Wednesday, April 8, 2020

Review: City of Tears

The City of Tears

The City of Tears
Kate Mosse

This epic tale follows the Joubert family as they navigate the winds of change during the French Religious Wars of the sixteenth century. It opens with the family at their French estate in the Languedoc region, planing a trip to Paris to attend the wedding of King Henri IV to Marguerite de Valois. Once in Paris, violence breaks out between the Huguenots and the Catholic forces loyal to the Duke of Guise, which forces the family to flee. But, not before suffering an unbearable loss. Ending up in Amsterdam, Piet Joubert has been shadowed by his nemesis Cardinal Vidal who is determined to make sure Piet doesn't learn the truth about his heritage that would allow him to claim his rightful inheritance.

The City of Tears is filled with vivid characters and scenes from the past, making this a sweeping story full of drama with an underlying story of love and endurance. I think fans of historical fiction will enjoy this one. I was so enthralled; I couldn't put it down.

Thanks to Minotaur Books for allowing me to read this in exchange for an honest review.

Monday, March 30, 2020

Review: A Bitter Feast

A Bitter Feast (Duncan Kincaid & Gemma James, #18)

A Bitter Feast
Deborah Crombie

When Duncan Kincaid and wife Gemma James, both detectives at Scotland Yard, are invited to a weekend in the Cotswolds, they are expecting a relaxing break. But then Duncan is involved in a car crash that leaves a local woman and a once-famous chef dead. It seems the weekend may turn into something far less relaxing than they'd planned.

The couple and their children are staying with Melody Talbot and her parents at the beautiful country estate known as Beck House. During a local lunch put on by Melody's mother and catered by a local chef, Duncan and Gemma find themselves drawn into the investigation of the car accident. When a mysterious murder takes place in the village, more attention is focused on chef Viv Holland, who once worked for the famous chef.

A Bitter Feast is a fast-paced mystery with wonderfully developed characters and a storyline that makes it hard to put down. The author has a fantastic way of switching between characters and scenes to heighten the suspense, and I think that's what makes this such a riveting read. Having finished this one, I know I want to read another in this series. I'm wondering how it is that I hadn't heard of this author before now.

This review was originally written by me for City Book Review.

Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Review: The Queen's SIsters

The Queen's Sisters: The Lives of the Sisters of Elizabeth Woodville

The Queen's Sisters
Sarah J. Hodder

When Elizabeth Woodville married King Edward IV in secret in 1464, the fortunes of her family changed. The Queen's Sisters looks at the less documented lives of Elizabeth's sisters, with each chapter dedicated to one of her six or possibly seven sisters. The lives of these women were often exciting but also full of uncertainties and tragedies, especially when the fathers, husbands, or brothers were called to war or caught up in political intrigue and were faced with conflicting loyalties.

I found this book well written, easy to read, and full of interesting information. I liked that the author pointed out the role women were expected to play within the household and managing estates, especially when their husbands were away. It is hard to imagine how girls who married so young must have felt when they were expected to move in with in-laws and grow up away from their own families. Also, the fact that widows gained some independence after the death of a husband only to lose much of that if they remarried, almost made me wonder why they would even contemplate another marital alliance unless they were forced to do so.

It is sad to think how little was documented about the Queen's sisters. Considering their advantageous marriages and the fact that they were close to the center of power, one would think there would be more information available about them. And although the author might not have intended it, I found myself rather bothered by the fact that these women were largely ignored by history. Why should their lives and stories be so unimportant? Was it merely because of their gender? Thinking about this made me appreciate the author's interest in shedding light on this forgotten past, even if it meant having to dig through the history of men to learn about the secret lives of interesting and historically significant women.

Thanks to Chronos Books for allowing me to read this in exchange for an honest review.


Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Review: Be Mighty

Be Mighty: A Woman’s Guide to Liberation from Anxiety, Worry, and Stress Using Mindfulness and Acceptance
Be Mighty
Jill A. Stoddard, PhD

Be Mighty is a book for women who want to learn more about how anxious thoughts both help and hinder actions and how we live our daily lives. It provides useful tips and exercises to help uncover issues or circumstances that may result in avoidance of situations that cause stress and worry. Because anxiety has a role to play in our lives, serving as a warning sign or indicator of danger, this book isn't about helping you get rid of anxiety. It seeks to help you understand what might trigger stress and anxiety and how to deal with it and work through it.

Many of the tips and exercises in the book rely on ACT, Acceptance Commitment Therapy, which aims to help one become more flexible and more aware of feelings, thoughts, and emotions. You will need a journal or notebook to work through the exercises to get the most out of this book. And if you are willing to put in a little time and effort, I think you will find it an excellent source to address the things that might be holding you back, whether that's stressful social encounters or that horrid little voice in your head that often tells you you aren't good enough.

Be Mighty is designed to help you make new choices and become more flexible and hopefully become more of the You that you want to be. Overall, I think it is easy to read, the exercises are easy to follow and a good choice for someone wanting to gain more confidence, and as the author says, live mightily.


Thanks to New Harbinger Publications for allowing me to read and review this book in exchange for an honest review.


Monday, March 16, 2020

Review: Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding

Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding (Her Royal Spyness #12)

Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding
Rhys Bowen

Lady Georgiana Rannoch is looking forward to her wedding to Irishman Darcy O'Mara. She only wishes he wouldn't disappear off to work so often and that they could find an affordable place to live in London once they are married. Just in the nick of time, Georgiana's godfather offers his estate to the couple. He's often away in exotic locations, and if the couple moves in it will no longer lie empty. But the estate isn't how Georgiana remembers it from her childhood. The once tidy grounds and the well-run house are both in the hands of an incompetent group of servants, who seem more than a little fishy to Georgiana.

When her mother and grandfather finally arrive along with her maid Queenie, she will have some help trying to uncover what the servants have been up to during her godfather's absence. This is, if they don't get themselves in over their heads.

This was the first book I've read in this series by Rhys Bowen, but I know it won't be the last. It was such a fun book, filled with charming characters and a plot that made it a good whodunit. Now that I have read Four Funerals and Maybe a Wedding, I can't wait to see what mysteries await Georgiana in other volumes of this series.

This review was originally written by me for City Book Review.


Thursday, March 12, 2020

Review: Is it Alzheimer's

'Is It Alzheimer's?' cover image

Is it Alzheimer's
Peter V. Rabins, MD, MPH

Is it Alzheimer's is an easy to read book about the differences between typical memory loss and signs of dementia. There is also an overview describing how it is determined and diagnosed. The author presents questions and answers to often asked questions about this complex disease. With around 5.1 million adults suffering from some form of dementia in the United States, this book was designed with the family of patients, friends, and caregivers in mind.

As someone with a relative suffering from this disease, I found many of the explanations in this book both helpful and reassuring. It is likely to be a resource that I will consult in the future. I do wish, though, that it had addressed more thoroughly how to deal with a patient who exhibits aggressive or paranoid behavior at what the author describes as the sundown period or effect. While this book may not answer all the questions I have, it is a good start. I also learned that the author has another book entitled The 36-Hour Day, which goes into much more detail about Alzheimer's and dementia. Is it Alzheimer's is meant to be a supplement to it.

Thanks to Johns Hopkins Press for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review.


Wednesday, March 11, 2020

Review: Murder in an Irish Cottage

Murder in an Irish Cottage (Irish Village Mystery #5)

Murder in an Irish Cottage
Carlene O'Connor

Siobhán and her fiance Macdara, both members of the Gardaí, the Irish police, are called to a small village by Macdara's cousin Jane, who seems to be in a panic. When they arrive at the cottage, Jane shares with her mother Ellen; they find Ellen is dead. Has she been poisoned? According to Jane, everyone in the village disliked Ellen. The cottage itself seemed to be the problem. The villagers wanted to tear it down, fearing fairies haunted it. But Ellen wasn't prepared to move. Siobhán and Macdara think there could be more to the story, and even though the case isn't in their district, that isn't going to stop them from investigating the death of a family member.

Cozy mystery fans will love this village murder mystery. Not only is it well written, but it's also full of fun characters, folklore as well as lots of twists and turns. A satisfying read indeed. So, make a cup of tea and sit back and enjoy the search for a killer. Hopefully, you will enjoy this one as much as I did. It left me waiting for another installment.


Thanks to Goodreads and Kensington Books for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

Thursday, March 5, 2020

Review: Mind over Weight

Mind over Weight: Curb Cravings, Find Motivation, and Hit Your Number in 7 Simple Steps

Mind Over Weight
Ian K. Smith, M.D.

This book is designed to help those who want to lose weight by finding strategies that help to get you motivated and stay on track to meet goals. The seven steps are as follows. First, you want to make sure you are in the right frame of mind to start a diet. Then you need to set goals so that you will have a course of action to follow. Then one needs to find the best diet to follow. Once you have a plan, you might need some help to deal with cravings as you try to lose weight. You may also need to seek ways to boost your confidence so that you are more likely to succeed or stick to your diet plan. Afterward, to ensure further success, you will want to create a positive environment and address your overall relationship with food in general.

The author provides some useful tips and strategies to help you plan and execute a diet. The suggestions are ones that are easy to follow. Plus, they allow the reader to approach his or her nutrition from a personal point of view. What I like about this book is the fact that the strategies provided within could be used to meet other goals as well. So, Mind Over Weight might be just the beginning. This is a book that I will revisit and consult when I need tips or advice on restarting my diet or just when I need a boost.

Thanks to St. Martin's Press for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review.


Monday, March 2, 2020

Review: The Hunting Party

The Hunting Party

The Hunting Party
Lucy Foley

Every New Year's Eve a group of former Oxford graduates and lifelong friends gather to celebrate. This year they will be ringing in the New Year on a remote Scottish estate in the highlands. When the food and wine start to flow it becomes apparent that the friends have a lot of secrets they've been hiding from one another. Things take a turn for the worse when one of them disappears. An overnight blizzard means it isn't going to be easy to find the guest or get help when it's needed. Lodge manager Heather and Gamekeeper Doug will have to do the best they can to find out what's happened to the missing guest but they also have a few demons they are battling with as well.

The Hunting Party is a wonderfully plotted mystery with a load of suspense and well-developed characters. Everyone has a motive, and any one of them could be a victim. You won't know which is which until you get to the end. So, whether it's the Scottish setting or the feisty characters, I feel sure mystery lovers are going to appreciate this one. I know I couldn't put it down.

This review was originally written by me for City Book Review.

Friday, February 28, 2020

Review: 142 Ostriches

142 Ostriches

142 Ostriches
April Dávila

Tallulah Jones wants nothing more than to get away from the family ranch in the Mojave desert. She's got a job lined up in Montana, and she's looking forward to striking out on her own. But, before that happens, her grandmother Helen dies, leaving the ranch and 142 ostriches to her. Tallulah is convinced the only thing she can do is sell to a despised neighbor and move on. Only, before she can do that, she needs to find out why the ostriches have stopped laying eggs. And if that weren't enough, she still has to tell the rest of the family she's planning to sell. This might not be as easy as she thought since Aunt Christine and her girls might need her help, and Uncle Steve, a recovering drug addict, isn't pleased that Tallulah has inherited the ranch in the first place. He's turned up to make a world of trouble for her. With all the chaos that ensures Tallulah has to decide what she wants out of life. Will it be the place she's called home since she was thirteen, or will she turn away from all she's known, in the search for something else?

142 Ostriches is an intriguing story full of terrific characters, a stark desert setting, and a fast pace that will keep discerning readers turning the pages to see just what Tallulah will do next. I love the way the author captures the stress and anxiety felt by her and how her past keeps her searching for something elusive. The dysfunctional family was not only well portrayed but made this book more vivid and engaging. I can't wait to see what the author writes next.

Thanks to Kensington Books for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review.


Monday, February 24, 2020

Review: The Golden Hour

The Golden Hour

The Golden Hour
Beatriz Williams

It's 1941, and Lulu Randolph, recently widowed, finds herself in the Bahamas looking for a story for a New York magazine. As she befriends the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, connecting with their social circle, she comes to see that not all is golden with the couple. Their political views are also less than desirable. While on the island, she meets and marries Benedict Thorpe only to find that he disappears when the island's wealthiest man is murdered.

Lulu travels to London, hoping to find him, even though the war is sure to hamper her efforts. As she meets up with Thorpe's sister, she learns the complicated story behind Thorpe and his family, particularly that of Elfriede, a German woman caught in a loveless marriage. As the tale proceeds, the stories converge, leaving Lulu to wonder whether she will ever find her husband again.

Fans of historical fiction will appreciate the author's attention to detail and her beautiful prose. The Golden Hour is a story that carries the reader away, across time and place, to uncover secrets and an ending to a family drama that contains an unforeseen twist or two.

Thanks to William Morrow for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review.


Friday, February 21, 2020

Review: Bella Figura

Bella Figura: How to Live, Love, and Eat the Italian Way

Bella Figura
Kamin Mohammadi

Bella Figura, or the art of appreciation and living well, is what Kamin Mohammadi learns all about when she relocates to Italy. After leaving her job as a magazine editor in London and suffering from a breakup with her boyfriend, she decides to move to Florence to make a new start in life.

The only plan she has is to write a book and take some time off for herself. It isn't long, however, until she meets some new friends who help her discover the meaning of Bella Figura. She soon finds herself in a new relationship with Roberto, a local. Overwhelmed by the intensity of the affair, she is taken aback when things don't turn out the way she expected. It may be that she has to kiss a few toads before finding her prince charming. Despite this, she learns to appreciate her time in Florence, and when the right man comes along, she will be ready to see where love takes her.

Mohammadi's charm, honesty and the courage to reveal personal ups and downs made this book a joy to read. The inclusion of Italian recipes at the end of each chapter is also a nice touch.

This review was originally written by me for City Book Review.

Monday, February 17, 2020

Review: Unto Us a Son Is Given

Unto Us a Son Is Given (Commissario Brunetti, #28)

Unto Us a Son Is Given
Donna Leon

Commissario Brunetti is back! In this latest installment of Donna Leon's mesmerizing detective series, Brunetti is asked by his father-in-law, Count Falier, to look into some rumors he's heard about a long time friend. Gonzalo Rodriguez de Tejada wants to adopt a young man as his son, which Italian law allows. But is this younger man only interested in the older man's money and art collection? Either way, Gonzalo has made up his mind. But when he suddenly dies and one of his close friends is found dead, Brunetti has a case to solve, one that makes him think a lot about the meaning of love, family, and friendship.

Donna Leon is a master at creating a sense of place; as a result, Venice shines through the pages of this novel. I can think of no other fictional detective with the heart and soul of Guido Brunetti, who is devoted to his family, his job and his city. With vivid and intriguing narrative, Leon brings the reader right into the minds of the characters, and each one is more interesting than the next. Coupled with unexpected twists and turns Unto Us a Son is Given doesn't disappoint.

This review was written by me for City Book Review.

Thursday, February 13, 2020

Review: The Missing Years

The Missing Years

The Missing Years
Lexie Elliott

Alisa Calder has inherited a Manse in the Scottish countryside. The problem is, she only owns half of it. The other half belongs to her father, and he disappeared years ago. Frankly, she'd like to sell the Manse, she can't imagine living in it. But until her father is proclaimed dead, she can't do that. Alisa decides to leave London and stay temporarily in the house with her half-sister until she can sort out the administration around the house.

Upon her arrival, Alisa feels the house is watching her. There is something sinister about it even if she can't put her finger on it. It definitely has its secrets, and she wonders if it is haunted. To top it off the villagers aren't that happy with Alisa's return and a few of them are keen to let her know that. Nevertheless, being back in her childhood home leads her to wonder what actually happened to her father all those years ago.

This compelling mystery left me on the edge of my seat. There were so many things that seemed to go bump in the night, creating a wonderfully atmospheric tale. The characters didn't disappoint either. If you liked the author's debut work The French Girl, you will love The Missing Years.

This review was originally written by me for City Book Review.

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Review: A Long Way Off

A Long Way Off

A Long Way Off
Pascal Garnier

Marc feels like he needs to get away. He doesn't feel connected to his wife and the people around him anymore. While visiting his daughter Anne in hospital, he decides to take a trip. He convinces Anne to come along with him and his cat Boudu to the French coastal town of Le Touquet. The journey turns into a more extended road trip that finds them headed towards the town of Agen in a camper van. What transpires is a trail of disaster that leaves them so far from home, there may be no way back.

The title of this book might be A Long Way Off, but as far as I'm concerned, this one was spot on. It was just what I've come to expect from Garnier's work, a bit of darkness shot through with humor at the oddest moments. Like his other works, this one gets under the skin. I think Garnier fans and fans of the noir genre, in general, will find this short book highly entertaining.

Thanks to Gallic Books for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review.


Thursday, January 30, 2020

Review: Shelved Under Murder

Shelved Under Murder (Blue Ridge Library Mysteries #2)

Shelved Under Murder
Victoria Gilbert

When Librarian Amy Webber, her boyfriend Richard, and library assistant Sunny decide to head out to a farm in the Blue Ridge Mountains to pick up a painting from artist Rachel LeBlanc, which has been donated for charity, the last thing they expect to find is a body. The body isn't just anyone either; it's the artist herself. Rachel's husband, Reese is missing, and the police find a cache of forged paintings in the barn where Rachel's body was found. Amy has her doubts about the young man the police are looking for in connection with the crime. And, although she is busy with the Taylorsford, Virginia, arts and crafts festival in town, she is only too happy to find time to help the police catch a killer. Of course, trying to find a killer may be more dangerous than she first suspects.

Cozy mystery lovers will appreciate Victoria Gilbert's ability to create fun, memorable characters as well as a twisting tale of art deception focusing on both the past and present. Shelved Under Murder is a delight to read, and will no doubt leave fans wanting stories from Taylorsford Virginia.

This review was written by me for City Book Review.


Monday, January 27, 2020

Review: Where Have all the Boys Gone

Where Have All the Boys Gone?

Where Have All The Boys Gone
Jenny Colgan

Katie Watson works in PR in London. She's single and spends her time going out with friends Louise and Olivia. The prospects of finding a decent man in London is not easy, particularly since women far outnumber men. But when she gets a new assignment in a remote Scottish village, she finds she's in a town with a lot of men and very few women. It should be a dream come true. But is it? Her job is to help save a forest from being turned into a golf course. The fresh air and her cranky boss Harry are a far cry from the chaos and excitement of London, but if she can persevere, the highlands might throw a few surprises her way.

Where Have All The Boys Gone was such a fun book to read. I felt like I had been whisked off on an adventure. The characters were memorable, and it was full of fast-paced action. I think it's fair to say that once you get started on this one, you won't be able to put it down. This was my first time reading a novel by Jenny Colgan. I can't wait to read another one now that I know she is such an entertaining author.

Thanks to LibraryThing and William Morrow for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

Friday, January 24, 2020

Review: Sir Francis Bryan

Sir Francis Bryan: Henry VIII's Most Notorious Ambassador

Sir Francis Bryan
Sarah-Beth Watkins

Sir Francis Bryan was a member of Henry VIII's inner circle, and throughout his life, he served the King in various capacities. But more often than not, he seems to have sent his time representing the King as ambassador to France. Bryan spent much of his time engaged in Henry's obsession with either declaring war on France or finding ways to outmaneuver his on and off again neighbor and ally. As one of Henry's most trusted friends and members of the court, he undertook numerous missions for the King. Even traveling to Rome to help persuade the Pope to agree to Henry's divorce from Queen Katherine so that he could marry Ann Boleyn, a cousin of his from his mother's side of the family. He was also related to another of Henry's Queens, Katherine Parr.

Unlike many others at Henry's court, Bryan managed to stay mostly on the right side of the King, even as the King became increasingly unpredictable. He managed to outlive him and serve his son King Edward VI. From this account of his life and work, I found myself wondering when he had time for a private life; he was so busy traveling and working for the court.

Before picking up this book, I didn't know anything about this man who played such a significant role in Henry's life. Not only was this a well-written account of his times, but it was also fascinating. I enjoyed seeing how many familiar figures from history were related to one another and how they fared during changing times. If you are as intrigued by Tudor history as I am, this is a book you will not want to miss.

Thanks to Chronos Books for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Review: Party Girls Die in Pearls

Party Girls Die in Pearls: An Oxford Girl Mystery

Party Girls Die in Pearls
An Oxford Girl Mystery
Plum Sykes

When Ursula Flowerbottom arrives at Oxford University, she is ready for a productive academic year, full of lectures and sleepless nights spent studying in the library. Her new American friend, Nancy, on the contrary, is much more interested in Oxford's party scene and snagging a well-connected aristocrat. Before either can settle into their new lives at Christminster College, an aristocratic “it” girl, India Brattenbury is murdered.

In order to pursue her dream of writing for the prestigious college newspaper, Ursula sets out to discover who killed India. Nancy is all too ready to help find out more about India if it means she can attend the numerous posh balls at the college and at the same time hunt for a new beau.

This fabulous mystery kept me entertained from beginning to end. Ms. Sykes really knows how to keep the reader invested in the story with brilliant descriptions and fun characters. I was so glued to the page, I almost hated to make it to the end. Not only was the 1980's setting a hoot, but it brought back long forgotten memories. I'm so glad I got to read this one.

This review was written by me for City Book Review.

Friday, January 10, 2020

Review: How the Light Gets In

How the Light Gets In (Chief Inspector Armand Gamache, #9)

How The Light Gets In
Louise Penny

Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Sûreté de Québec gets a call from a friend in the village of Three Pines, claiming a friend is missing. She never made it to the village for Christmas. Gamache heads to the remote town with his assistant to see what he can find out. Frankly, he could use a break from the office. His department has been slowly dismantled, leaving him surrounded by officers he doesn't trust and whose loyalties may lie elsewhere.

While Gamache is looking for the missing woman, who was once famous for being one of the nation's first surviving quintuplets, he's also aware that his superior officers are up to no good. If only he could find out what they are up too then perhaps he could prevent them from bringing shame onto the respected force. That is if they don't find and stop him first.

How The Light Gets In is another gripping tale involving a man who never loses faith in the institution he is sworn to serve. Like the other books in this series, it has everything the reader could want, a great plot, wonderful characters, and a fantastic setting. This beautifully written, complex tale is something Penny's fans will not want to miss.


Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Review: The Positive Shift

The Positive Shift: Mastering Mindset to Improve Happiness, Health, and Longevity

The Positive Shift
Catherine A. Sanderson, PhD

Do you want to live longer? Well, feeling happy might help you do that. The Positive Shift examines what makes us happy, and in some cases, what makes us unhappy. How we think about ourselves and our social conditioning plays a part in our happiness, and there are ways in which we can shift our thinking and behaviors to find more happiness in life.

By answering a few questions at the beginning of this book, you will find out whether you are a born optimist or a pessimist. In the second part of the book, you will find tips to help you shift your mindset. For example, spending more time in nature has been shown to increase focus, memory, and mood. Feeling gratitude, volunteering, and having more shared experiences with friends and family are also ways to increase happiness and in the long run, live longer.
The Positive Shift is a well-written, thoughtful book that provides a look at a large number of studies which show that increased happiness can have a significant impact on the quality of life. The examples mentioned in this book are easy to follow and helpful for mastering the mindset needed for a better life.

This review was originally written by me for CityBook Review.

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Review: High Heels & Beetle Crushers

High Heels & Beetle Crushers: The Life, Losses and Loves of an Officer and Lady

High Heels & Beetle Crushers
Jackie Skingley

This memoir follows the life of Jackie Skingley as she grows from a young girl at home with her mother and stepfather, to an aspiring young ladies determined to strike out on her own by joining the Women's Royal Army Corps. The book is full of emotional stories of love and loss, as well as the great sense of camaraderie she found with the other women who joined the corps. The reader gets an understanding of the changes going on in Britain during the 1960s and how that affected women. Especially those who wanted to have a career and not just a life inside the home. It seemed a shame that married women had to choose whether to serve their country or build a life around a husband. But Mrs. Skingley faced that just like she faced any other obstacles and difficulties, head-on.

High Heels & Beetle Crushers is more than just a personal memoir. It's a look at the changing roles of women in the 1960's. I found Mrs. Skingley to be an excellent storyteller. I became so engrossed in her story and with the details of how she handled issues that came up either while she was on duty or while trying to manage her personal life that I had a hard time putting the book down. I have a feeling that she might have some more exciting stories up her sleeve that readers would love to hear.

Thanks to Chronos Books for allowing me to read this book in exchange for an honest review.